Climate

Puerto Rico’s climate varies around 80 fahrenheit to 90 fahrenheit throughout the year, the hottest months are through June to September, with the temperature ranging extremely close to 90 degrees fahrenheit. The precipitation shows the most rain is during May, with 6.1 inches of rain during the month. The rainiest area is the interiors of the main island registering around 200 inches per year, in particular Cordillera Central, and the Caribbean National Forest (or El Yunque) the southern coast is the least rainiest area with about 36 inches; northern part of the island is about 61 inches. Some coastal regions receive up to 150 inches (381 cm) of rain per year. With the precipitation combined with the rainfall, soil erosion causes instability in the mountains, many of the mud dries up on top of limestone and other minerals, and once interacting with water, it can pile on and create landslides. Mountainous areas such as the northern slopes of the central mountain range could be particularly susceptible to threats like this, as the
slopes are steeper, and the humidity in the forest rises during rainfall season.

 

Hurricane season runs between June 01 to November 30, with the peak month being around August and September. There is less risk of hurricanes or thunderstorms during the months of June and July when there is relatively low rainfall, especially in the southern west coast where it is less rainy in general Looking at previous Hurricane data, most hurricanes start at the east coast and makes its way across to the northwest. The most destructive hurricane on record in Puerto Rico is Hurricane San Ciriaco, according to the Hispanic American Historical Review. The hurricane, which made landfall in Aug. 8, 1899, is still on record as the longest-lived Atlantic hurricane, at nearly 28 days

Map of past hurricanes that have hit Puerto Rico.

Devastated homes in Cayey.

Devastated homes in Cayey.